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February 28, 2014
Photo of deer and wild turkeys in the exhibit “The Nature of Ohio” at the Ohio History Center in Columbus.Photo of a trilobite and other fossils in “The Nature of Ohio” exhibit at the Ohio History Center in Columbus.Photo of an immature bald eagle in the nest in the exhibit “The Nature of Ohio” at the Ohio History Center in Columbus.Photo of Battelle Discovery Park, an indoor play-and-learn area for young visitors to the exhibit “The Nature of Ohio” at the Ohio History Center in Columbus.Photo of the Conway Mastodon in the exhibit “The Nature of Ohio” at the Ohio History Center in Columbus.
On Exhibit
All Natural

Did you know that the Ohio History Center is a natural history museum, too? In our big permanent exhibit, The Nature of Ohio, you can learn about the plants, wildlife and other natural features that make Ohio Ohio, and how they’ve changed over time.

A Whole World Devoted to Ohio’s Natural Wonders
Many people recognize the biggest and most prominent item in our natural history exhibit, the Conway Mastodon skeleton unearthed in 1887 (affectionately known simply as Conway), but he’s really just the doorkeeper to a whole area devoted to Ohio’s natural wonders.

In The Nature of Ohio, you’ll learn about Ohio’s Ice Age (yes, there was an earlier one); climate and weather; geography and topography; plants, vegetation and forests; animals and wildlife; geology and minerals; and fossils. Touch-screens offer video on severe weather in Ohio and more natural history topics.

Animals and Wildlife Are Popular
One popular section of the exhibit is devoted to mounted specimens of animals, birds, fish and other Ohio wildlife. 

“Girl Scouts love camping in The Nature of Ohio exhibit during our special overnights at the museum,” says Public Programs Manager Susan Brouillette. “The most coveted spot is near the bison.”

For younger visitors, the colorful indoor Battelle Discovery Park located near the center of the exhibit combines learning and active play with nature-related puzzles and books, animal puppets and more.

Ohio History Center Museum Hours and Admission
The Ohio History Center museum, including The Nature of Ohio, is open five days a week: Wednesdays–Saturdays 10 a.m.–5 p.m. and Sundays noon–5 p.m. Ohio History Center museum admission is $10/adult; $9/senior (age 60+); $5/youth (ages 6–12); Free/Ohio History Connection member; Free/child (age 5 and under). The museum is closed Mondays and Tuesdays.

Questions about visiting the Ohio History Center? Call 800.686.6124.

Nature Lover?

Like your history all-natural? You may enjoy these other Ohio History Connection sites, too:

Cedar Bog Nature Preserve, between Springfield and Urbana

Davis Memorial Nature Preserve, near Peebles

Flint Ridge Ancient Quarries and Nature Preserve, Glenford, between Newark and Zanesville

Fort Ancient Earthworks and Nature Preserve, near Oregonia and Lebanon

Fort Hill Earthworks and Nature Preserve, near Hillsboro

Glacial Grooves Geological Preserve, on Kelleys Island in Lake Erie
(Ferry service to Kelleys Island resumes April 1)

Leo Petroglyphs and Nature Preserve, near Leo and Jackson

Wahkeena Nature Preserve, near Sugar Grove and Lancaster
(Opens for the 2014 season April 2)

Most Ohio Historical Society sites are managed for us by local organizations. Though hours posted online reflect the most current information we have, we encourage calling ahead before you travel, to confirm that the site you plan to visit will be open when you plan to be there. Find maps and direct phone numbers on each site page at www.ohiohistory.org/places.